Past Awards

Need some inspiration? Or just curious about what others have entered in the past? Then you might like to check back through previous years of the Awards here.

2023 Local History Awards

2023 Local History Awards

Over the years, the Local History Collection at the Victoria Park Library has received, through these Awards, many wonderful photographs, poems, anecdotes, stories and original research.

Entries have covered many humorous, fascinating and intriguing aspects of our Town’s history and this year’s entries are no exception. But leading up to this the 2023 running of the Local History Awards, we knew we wanted to spread the “local history love” and encourage more entries and generate more awareness in the community.

Last year, we ran a program of events to highlight the Local History Awards, it was a Pre-Local History Awards Program aimed at increasing awareness of the Awards, and providing research guidance, hints and tips to those who may like to enter.

We have also been aware over time, that people may have been nervous about entering the Awards. One of the many reasons for this was they thought they didn’t have anything relevant or interesting to share.

We decided that one of the events in our Pre-Local History Awards Program would feature some of the winners from the 2021 event. Very graciously, four of the previous winners presented and spoke about why they entered the 2021 Awards, how they prepared their entries and how they felt about the process as a whole. They also presented their entries to the audience across two of the events and the Library received lots of positive feedback regarding how encouraged people were to hear from previous entrants. A big thank you to all those presenters: Patrick Low, Graham Carpenter, Carole Rutter and Sharon Mitchell.

A big shout out to Kris Bizzaca, a professional historian and one of our judges for this year. Kris presented two of the events in the Pre-Local History Awards Program that were both a huge success, with more people wanting to attend than could be fit into the Library!

Kris’ sessions were called “Who’s Been Living in My House?” and guided attendees in how to research the history of houses, the best resources to consult and how to interpret those records. Thank you, Kris for sharing your wonderful talent, time and passion for history with us, it is so very much appreciated.

Following on from the success of the Pre-Local History Award Program of events, the Library headed into the submission period for these Awards in January feeling cautiously excited. By the close of the submission period on the 31 March this year we had more than double the number of entries that were received in the 2021 Awards!

Thank you to the following people for their time and talent, but most of all for their very valuable gift in recording the history of our wonderful Victoria Park. We can tell the stories, because you care and have shared with us in the first place.

To all our entrants in the 2023 Local History Awards – Thank you:

Eric Brand, Graham Carpenter, Peter Furey, Kaye Hill, Trevor Hislop, Eric Keijzer, Wendy Lugg, Greg Mahney, Sharon Mitchell, Jo Newman, Oliver Newman, Blake Roberts, Chiara Roberts, Carole Rutter, Pat Saunders, Les Stevens and Martin Suter.

We had four categories in the 2023 Local History Awards and there were two cash prizes available as first and second prize with the judges also reserving the right to not award a prize and also to award Honourable Mentions to entries.

 “The Winners…”

We had four categories in the 2023 Local History Awards and there were two cash prizes available as first and second prize with the judges also reserving the right to not award a prize and also to award Honourable Mentions to entries. 

Photographic Memoirs

First prize goes to Wendy Lugg for her photograph entitled “Bleak Times for the Sinclair Family”.

The judges were captivated by the “evocative image of Henry (Harry) Sinclair, a Gallipoli veteran, who contracted tuberculosis, which progressed from his chest to his pubic bones. After two years of institutional treatment at Edward Millen House, he was given permission to go home and to be nursed by his wife. He slept on the back verandah, but spent his days on the front verandah of the family home in Hubert Street. He ‘faded’ away, dying at age 34, in 1930, leaving his wife widowed with two children at the height of the Depression. There is a 23-page file in the National Archives of Australia on this man’s war service. The image highlights the reality of life for this man, who served in Gallipoli, and his family, and reminds us of the difficulties of ordinary families living in Vic Park in a time of great upheaval.

No 2nd place or Honourable Mentions awarded.  

Personal Memoirs 

First prize went to Kaye Hill for her entry entitled “Two Blocks of Land and a Sewing Machine: Growing up at 107 Westminster Street, East Victoria Park”.

The judges were impressed with this well presented and referenced entry. They said it is “a very detailed and comprehensive account of growing up in Westminster Street 1956-2000. Under each subheading is a wealth of information on each subject area, also bringing in the human element – neighbours, relatives, shopkeepers, [and] teachers – which add depth and colour to the story, the house, the street. An excellent personal reminiscence, backed up by a wide range of sources.” The judges and all who have seen the photograph in Kaye’s entry of her parents washing up in the kitchen, remarked that this photograph would have been a definite contender for a place if it had been entered in the ‘Photographic Memories’ section too. I will leave it up to the audience to assess their own feelings when they see the picture in the Exhibition, but now we know there is a precedent husbands! Men can help with the household chores.

Second prize was awarded to Jo Newman for her entry entitled “Copper Pots, Socks and Jocks: Life Raising 5 Boys Under a Hills Hoist in the 1950s in East Victoria Park”.

A fun and lively description of the family life of Ken and Molly Newman at 16 Whittlesford Street, East Victoria Park. The judges described this entry as “delightful, though short – well written and takes the reader through many seemingly mundane aspects of family life, starting with the copper, the central point in the house and making them interesting and informative in a very engaging way.”

An Honourable Mention was awarded to Sharon Mitchell for her entry entitled “The Dargie Family of Lot 1297 Sydenham Street, ‘Bickford Gardens’, Victoria Park”.

The judges thought that there were some “tantalising unanswered questions” raised in Sharon’s entry, but they loved the “excellent images, house plan, colourful subdivision advertising and well captioned images.” 

Original Poetry or Performance Work

The judges were so impressed with Graham Carpenter’s entry into the 2021 Awards of “Boulevard of Broken Cars” that they recommended this special category be created for poetry in subsequent iterations of the awards. And we were most pleased to have received five entries into the Original Poetry or Performance Work category for its inaugural running.

The judges really appreciated the creativity and talent displayed by all the entries in this category and the visual picture they each painted of a different section of the Town’s history is of vital importance to our local history. The high calibre of entries in this category made it the judges decision most difficult and in the end their opinions were tied on two poems deserving of the first place award. So we had a tie for first prize between Erica Keijzer and Pat Saunders.

Erica Keijzer was awarded equal first prize for her poem entitled “The Great Sewage Debate”. The judges said that Erica’s poem is “a lively, entertaining account of the Victoria Park sewage debate of 1890, bringing in many aspects of the issue and its resolution”.

Pat Saunders was awarded equal first prize for her poem entitled “McCallum Park Lockdown”. This was a wonderful look at a modern piece of history and a local experience of the Covid-19 lockdowns. The judges liked that it “set the scene initially and then brings in lockdown.” It is “perceptive, topical, original and entertaining.”

The remaining three entries were awarded Honourable Mentions:

Les Stevens’ poem entitled “In the Past” was awarded an Honourable Mention with the judges saying it was a “rhyming poem, about life in Vic Park. Relevant, reads well and covers many aspects of Vic Park.”

Martin Suter’s poem entitled “In Those Early Days Which Were So Special to Us All” was awarded an Honourable Mention and the judges loved how it painted a clear picture of the lifestyle of yesteryear in an interesting way.

Graham Carpenter entered his poem that are also song lyrics entitled “Broken Hill Conversation”. The judges loved how it depicted setting of the Broken Hill Hotel in 1993, bringing to life the atmosphere of the famed hotel, mentioning pool games, juke boxes and music, the hotel’s carpet, the lodgers from upstairs, bikies, girls – both raunchy and dancing. The judges loved how it really captured the spirit of the hotel, with one of the judges in particular finding that it brought the bar scene to life so that images and smells of yesteryear were brought to mind and were very real to all the senses.

Original Research 

First prize was awarded to Sharon Mitchell for her entry entitled “The House That Bill Built: 28 Star Street Carlisle”. The Judges said that Sharon’s entry “paints a detailed picture of family living conditions and life in the 1940s and 1950s, highlighting the significant contribution and dedication of Bill Holmes in providing the family with their own home by building it himself. The contribution of family members in assisting Bill, is also something that would be unusual today and it is important that this is noted. Bill’s wife Jessie, though fulfilling the traditional female wifely role, was also expected to contribute to the building. Though the main proponent was undoubtedly Bill, it comes through as a family effort.”

Second prize was awarded to Trevor Hislop for his entry entitled “A Walk in Canterbury Park: A detailed look at some East Victoria Park properties representative of much of East Victoria Park, but focusing on Canterbury Terrace, 1900-1935”.

The judges commented that Trevor’s entry was ”An impressive piece of research, focusing on a particular area, bringing in not only the physical aspects of the area, but the people and their activities as well.”

No Honourable Mentions awarded in this category. 

‚ÄčOriginal Research (by a School Aged Child) 

Two outstanding entries were submitted by young children into the Original Research category of these Awards. The judges decided with unanimous agreement from the Local History Coordinator that it was not appropriate or fair for the children to compete with adults and professionals in the ‘Original Research’ category. Thus it was that the Judges asked for the creation of a special category, and so the new category of ORIGINAL RESEARCH (By a School Aged Child) was born.

First prize was awarded to Oliver Newman aged 10, for his entry entitled “The Burning History of the Victoria Park Fire Stations 1900-2023”. The judges said that Oliver’s entry was “a very readable narrative, informally written and using humour playing on his subject matter - ‘up in smoke’, ‘a bright spark’, ‘burning question’, ‘keeping our history alight’. A delight to read and contains a wealth of information arranged chronologically. Perceptive – critical analysis – short hoses and no hydrants, identifying that the first fire station was made largely of wood and there was a wooden ladder on the fire engine - not the best material to have in a fire. Excellent conclusion, with an overview followed by the Fireman’s Prayer.”

Second prize was awarded to the brother and sister research duo: Blake and Chiara Roberts (aged 11 and 7) and was entitled “The Story of Martin John Healy”. Martin John Healy was born in Scotland and came to Australian in 1911. His family lived in Victoria Park. In World War I, Martin served in Gallipoli and France. He was wounded several times and spent time as a prisoner of war in Germany. He is remembered for his bravery. He is also the great-great grandfather of Blake and Chiara. The judges were very impressed with the well-presented entry, that included nine pages of narrative which was generously interspersed with images, family photos and a timeline as an appendix.

Judges commended the use of headings and footnotes in Blake and Chiara’s work and said that it was “a nice little story and a great addition to the family archives. Well thought out and logically and attractively presented”. 

 

2021 Local History Awards

2021 Local History Awards

Original Research

First place goes to Patrick O’Reilly Low for his, as the judges put it, "interesting, well-written and well presented piece that used a variety of primary sources on the background, life and death of a Victoria Park identity” named Patrick O’Reilly. Patrick O'Reilly was the builder of the old Town Hall and also built the original St Joachim’s church (no longer standing) and our Patrick’s research (that is the Patrick here with us tonight) really brings out the life and heart of his ancestor the builder and one time councillor of the Municipality of Victoria Park. This entry was not only a family history but also a local history of high import.

The Story of Patrick O'Reilly by Patrick O'Reilly Low

Second place goes to Liz Deague. Liz entered excerpts from her larger work, titling her entry “Pages of My Mind: excerpts from ‘My Scrapbook of Memories’ representing the years of Betty Ginbey (nee Waterman) and her family’s life spent living in Victoria Park”. The Waterman family was resident in the Town from 1898 to 1959. Liz’s grandfather Alfred Waterman lived in Victoria Park and established his holiday home at what became Waterman’s Bay, after Alfred. Alfred was quite an entrepreneur and even held the patent for school desks at the time, which were then made in his factory near Albany Highway, Victoria Park.

Pages of My Mind: Excerpts from 'My Scrapbook of Memories' representing the years of Betty Ginbey (nee Waterman) and her family's life spent living in Victoria Park by Liz Deague

An Honourable Mention was awarded to Margot Hayes for her work “Who Lived in My House: 14 Temple Street, Victoria Park”. The judges appreciated the impressive amount of original research collected as part of Margot’s entry, which is a historical survey of number 14 Temple Street, Victoria Park. Margot's entry is available to view in the Library.

Personal Memoirs

The calibre of entries in this category was high, with the judges deciding that there were two equal winners for first place:

Sharon Mitchell’s entry is the personal memoirs of her mother Jessie and is a lovely peek into the 91 and still going, wonderful years of Jessie’s life in the Town of Victoria Park. The judges particularly enjoyed the way Sharon’s writing recorded the important voice of women and mother’s in our society. The work includes photographs and makes a great contribution to the Local History collection in the recording of original material on Etwell Street and the area’s development around returned servicemen’s housing.

Jessie's story 91 years in the Town of Victoria Park by Sharon Mitchell

Carole Rutter’s entry the judges declared an absolute gem! They said also that it was “a delightful story of life as a child and of family life at 5 Moorgate Street. A good description of property and outbuildings, including layout and changes to them, social commentary on the type of people who lived in East Victoria Park and features the difficulties of outside dunnies and the importance of having an indoor one – a neighbour had one installed, but visitors had to still use the outside dunny.”

Dolls in Dark Dunnies by Carole Rutter

An Honourable Mention to Mr Graham Carpenter for his poem “Boulevard of Broken Cars” which the judges were absolutely thrilled by. “Praising this unusual and imaginative entry which captures the atmosphere of Victoria Park in the time when Albany Highway was the ‘drag was all car yards’ ". The judges were so impressed with this entry and have recommended a category especially for poetry and creative works in the 2023 Awards.

Boulevard of Broken Cars by Graham Desmond Carpenter

Photographic Memories

No entries were received for this category.

2019 Local History Photographic Awards

2019 Local History Photographic Awards

Photographic Memories Award

Award description: one or more photographs taken before 1994 with written description.

First Place – $500 - Mr Garnet Peek – who entered a collection of photographs of his family business Allpest and its premises during the 1950s and '60s

62-66-Canning-Highway-Victoria-Park-1958-G.-Raymond-Peek-2019-for-w-e
One of Mr Peek’s entries: 62-66 Canning Highway, Victoria Park 1958 - G. Raymond Peek - 2019

Second Place – $250 - Mr Neville Hills - 13 Staines Street, Lathlain (then Victoria Park), circa 1938 (C A first communion group, St Joachim's, Shepperton Road, Victoria Park c. 1941-42 (Courtesy of Neville Hills)

A-first-communion-group-St-Joachims-Shepperton-Road-Victoria-Park-c.-1941-42-Neville-Hills-Edit-for-w-e
One of Mr Hills entries: A first communion group, St Joachim's, Shepperton Road, Victoria Park c. 1941-42.

Photographic Studies Award

Award description: a series of photographs with substantial written commentary.

First Place – $500 - Mr John Gannaway – who entered a collection of photographs of his grandfather and former City of Perth Councillor for Victoria Park, Thomas Henry Fletcher.

A working bee during the building of the Fletcher's house at 97 Raleigh Street, Carlisle. Thomas Henry Fletcher in the front holding hammer.

One of Mr Gannaway’s entries: A working bee during the building of the Fletcher's house at 97 Raleigh Street, Carlisle. Thomas Henry Fletcher in the front holding hammer.


25th Anniversary Award

Award description: one or more photographs, with written description, taken between 1994 and 2019 capturing the theme of 25 years of Loving Vic Park.

First Place – $500 - Ms Sandra Smith – who entered a collection of photographs documenting 25 years of swimming in the Town.

Victoria Park Swimming Club's Annual Summer Multi-Club Carnival at Aqualife - 11th December 1994
One of Ms Smith’s entries: Victoria Park Swimming Club's Annual Summer Multi-Club Carnival at Aqualife - 11th December 1994

2015 Local History Awards

2015 Local History Awards

Personal memoirs

Winner: ‘Memories of Long Ago’ by Leslie John Stevens

Judges’ comments: “A well-told nostalgic snapshot of life as a child in Victoria Park and the information provided is of good value to the local history collection.”

Read ‘Memories of Long Ago’ by Leslie John Stevens

Runner-up: ‘Gieles’ Pastry Shop’ by Henk Giele

Judges’ comments: “An excellent personal memoir based on an oral history interview, which is nicely presented with relevant photographs that contribute to the story, and adds to our knowledge of Victoria Park businesses and families.

Original research

Winner: ‘A Man Called Stan’ by Roy Criddle

‘A Man Called Stan’ is the story of Victoria Park’s very own local hero – Stan Gurney, who volunteered in the Australian Imperial Force during the Second World War when he was awarded the Victoria Cross (posthumously) for bravery.

Runner-up: ‘They Served their Country with Honour’ by Jacquie Liddiard

‘They Served their Country with Honour’ contains the stories of a selection of the Victoria Park residents who fought in the First World War and are now listed on the new Victoria Park RSL Memorial Wall.

Photographic memories

Winner: ‘Terminus Bakery – Transport’ by Otto Walkemeyer

Judges’ comments: “A terrific series of photographs documenting changes to bread delivery in Victoria Park, along with supporting information about the business. An outstanding piece of work.”

Runner-up: ‘Terminus Bakery – Final days’ by Otto Walkemeyer

Judges’ comments: “A very nice photo essay showcasing the history of one of Victoria Parks’ old established family businesses.”

2014 Local History Awards

Photographic Memories

Winner: “Lathlain Park Service Station” by Amanda Myers

Photograph and description of the history of the station, the services provided and the social life around it in 1952.

About the photograph: Lathlain Park Service Station by Amanda Myers(PDF, 68KB)

Runner up: “Orrong Road Construction” by Ray Webster

A series of photographs of and commentary on the construction of Orrong Road in the late 1990’s.

Read Orrong Road Construction by Ray Webster

Original Research

Winner: “Victoria Park at War” by Jana Grabowsky

Provided some context to how the First World War affected the lives of residents in Victoria Park.

Runner up: “Some Lathlain Streets” by Neville Browne

Being a compilation of research from a number of sources relating to the naming of streets in Lathlain after war heroes.

Personal Memoirs

Winner: “Lathlain Memories” by Ray Webster

This piece talks about the transport, life and road systems around Lathlain. The entry includes insights on how lives were affected by issues such as the noise from the Maylands airport, the dust from the Swan Portland cement works and the construction of Orrong Road.

Read "Lathlain Memories" by Ray Webster

Runner up: “Victoria Park in the ‘30’s” by Jacqueline Brophy

An interesting memoir of the changes in Albany Highway between the author’s childhood and 1994. Of particular interest are the mention of the Town Hall, the theatres and the stables in State Street which were the headquarters of the 10th Light Horse Brigade.

Read Victoria Park in the 30's by Jacqui Brophy

2013 Local History Awards

2013 Local History Awards

On Friday 14 June 2013 a presentation was held in the Library to celebrate the winners of the 2013 Local History Awards “Uncovering our history: stories from Victoria Park”. The Mayor gave a welcome speech and presented the prizes for this the 12th anniversary of these Awards

Seven entries were received in the Personal Memoirs section. The entries contained information relating to the history and development of the Town, ranging from descriptions of a local park, to the local shops and traders who were so important to the Town. Also received were stories of family life in the 1940’s to 60’s and a very interesting essay on the Sussex Street Centre.

This year, for the first time, a Secondary Student Award was offered, with flyers forwarded to local high schools for distribution to interested students. Two entries were received, with both short essays describing a family living in Victoria Park. These entries were received from a year 7 student from the Australian Islamic College, and a year 9 student from Kent Street Senior High School.

The entries were judged by Dr Jennifer Weir and Mr Wayne Pantall.

Prizes:

  • Winners received $500
  • Highly Commended received $250

Personal Memoirs

Winners – joint 1st place awarded to Lois MacArthur and Madeleine Tingey

Winner: “My Life“ by Lois MacArthur

Mrs MacArthur’s entry, written as a mother’s letter to her daughter and son gives a wonderful description of typical Victoria Park life in the 1920’s-40’s.The domestic detail is fascinating and is an important contribution to the local history collection.

Winner: “Memories of a Dreaming Suburb“ by Madeleine Tingey

Mrs Tingey used a novel approach to writing by adopting the reflections of a hundred year old Moreton Bay Fig tree giving an interesting view of the life and changes in the vicinity of Kate Street Reserve and East Victoria Park

 

Highly Commended: “The Carlisle Milk Supply and the Lives of the Doney Family 1946-65” by Tresna Shorter

Ms Shorter’s entry included photographs and interviews and told the story of the importance to the Town of the Doney family and the Carlisle Milk Supply from 1946 to 1965.

All entrants were given a copy of “Beyond Matta Gerup: a history of Victoria Park” with some taking the opportunity to have their copy signed by the Mayor. The two student entrants were presented with a book voucher for participating in the Awards.

After the presentation, the entrants took the opportunity to discuss their entries with the Mayor, Cr Hayes and Mr Pantell.

The entries, which are a valuable historical record of the Town, are housed in the Local History Collection at the Library. 

 

2012 Local History Awards

2012 Local History Awards

[Under Construction]

2011 Local History Memories Competition

2011 Local History Memories Competition

[Under Construction]

2010 Local History Collection Photo Awards

Prizes were awarded to one winner ($400) and one runner up ($150) in each of the following categories.  

  • Pre 1950
  • 1950 to 1979
  • Photo Study
  • 1980-2008

Pre 1950

First Prize

Entrant: Ray Webster

Title: Carlisle Milk Run

Judges’ comments: This well preserved photo captures an era in history that is foreign to today’s generation. In the photo is Ray Doney with one of his three, rubber-tyred, horse-drawn carts. Ray delivered to milk customers from Orrong Road to Rutland Avenue, Carlisle.                      

 

Runner up

Entrant: Diane Pope

Title: Windows showing fashion of the time; SW Clarke Pty Ltd Albany Highway East Victoria Park

Judges’ comments: This photo beautifully captures the fashion and commercial architecture of the time, as well as an iconic family business which began in Victoria Park before additional stores were opened in other suburbs.     

 

1951 to 1979

First Prize

Entrant: Rod Williams

Title: “New Roundabout c1955”; Photo taken from the Causeway looking South East towards Albany Highway

Judge’s comments: This wonderful photo captures bustling Albany Highway in 1955. Not only can we see the round-about that the entrant named the photo after, we can also see a variety of modes of transport, street signs, the quality of the road and a surprising number of streetlights. 

Runner up

Entrant: Brian Raftis

Title: Aerial Photo showing Lathlain Oval, Lathlain School, the Hawker Sidley Wood Factory and the cleared area for the bowling club.     

Judges’ comments: This aerial photo captures a significant portion of the suburb of Lathlain, including Lathlain Oval, Lathlain School, the Hawker Sidley Wood Factory and the cleared area for the bowling club. It is significant in that it shows the development of the suburb; particularly when compared to photos taken in recent times.

 

Photo Study

This is the first year that the Photo Study category. It was introduced as a means to tell a story through photos that reflect the history of the Town of Victoria Park.

First Prize

Entrant: Alan Homewood

Title: The Corner Shops of Victoria Park: a photographic record      

Judges’ Comments: This is a comprehensive photo study of the current state of the many corner shops throughout the Town that carried a broad selection of merchandise crammed into a relatively small space. Many of these shops did not survive when they began to face competition from supermarkets; however it is pleasing to see the buildings have been retained their uniqueness as they’ve been converted to other uses.

Runner up

Entrant: Diane Pope

Title: SW Clarke Pty Ltd Celebrating 10 years in business

Judges’ comments: This beautiful photo study captures all aspects of a wonderful, family business well-known for its outstanding customer service. The study is comprehensive in that it includes a range of images reflecting many aspects of the business.     

       

1980 – 2008

First Prize

Entrant: Robert Clark

Title: “Gone but not forgot” 1994 Clarevale Isaia Pty Ltd Liqueur Wine & Spirit Manufacturer     and Maria’s Gift Shop on the corner of Miller Street and Albany Highway East Victoria Park  

Judges’ comments: This photo captures businesses along Albany Highway, including the iconic “Isaia” building with the clock that many residents and visitors to the Town remember fondly.                                        

                                                              

Runner up

Entrant: Ray Webster

Title: Old Victoria Park Railway Station taken in 2008 from the old now demolished footbridge. In the background is the new railway station, Rutland Parade and the Institute for the Blind.          

Judges’ comments: This clever photo captures the old and the new Victoria Park Railway stations.                       

2009 Capturing Your Stories Awards

2009 Capturing Your Stories Awards

[Under Construction]

2008 Local History Collection Photo Awards

2008 Local History Collection Photo Awards

[Under Construction]

2007 Local History Awards

2007 Local History Awards

[Under Construction]

2006 Local History Memories Competition

2006 Local History Memories Competition

[Under Construction]

2005 Local History Memories Competition

2005 Local History Memories Competition

[Under Construction]

2005 Local History Photo Competition

2005 Local History Photo Competition

[Under Construction]

2004 Local History Memories Competition

2004 Local History Memories Competition

[Under Construction]

2004 Local History Photo Competition

2004 Local History Photo Competition

[Under Construction]

2003 Local History Memories Competition

2003 Local History Memories Competition

[Under Construction]

2003 Local History Photographic Competition

2003 Local History Photographic Competition

[Under Construction]

2002 Local History Memories Competition

2002 Local History Memories Competition

[Under Construction]

2001 Local History Memories Competition

2001 Local History Memories Competition

[Under Construction]

2000 Local History Memories Competition

2000 Local History Memories Competition

[Under Construction]

1999 Local History Competition

1999 Local History Competition

The 1999 Local History Memories Competition again had two categories for people to enter:

  • Open – with a word limit of 4,000 words and prize money of: 1st $500; 2nd $250.
  • Upper High School – with a word limit of 2,000 words and prize money of: 1st $75; 2nd $75 and the school of the winning student also awarded $75.

The first and second places in each category could be awarded across entries in the following formats:

  • Written research
  • Original verse, anecdotes or songs
  • Photography, audio visual or videotape
  • Oral History

Introduced as a competition for written history, not photographs, five entries were received in the second running of the competition.

  • “Kent Street Senior High School” by Lara Jade Cutting
  • “A Retrospective look at Victoria Park” by Barbara Doran
  • “The House that Mack Built” by Fleur McLennan
  • “Recollections” by Donald A. Munro
  • “Probus Club of Victoria Park” by Unknown author, submitted by the club.

The Judges 

Mr. Dino Garva retired history lecturer at the Edith Cowan University lectured in Western Australian history and has written local histories.   He read the entries, gave comments and recommended the placegetters. 

Dr. Lindsay Hunter is a member of our History Advisory Committee and has an extensive knowledge of the history of Victoria Park, his doctorate was based on housing development in Victoria Park in the 1950’s.  He agreed to read the entries  and supported the recommendations for placegetters made by Mr. Garva.

The Winners… 

Open Section 

1st Prize: “A Retrospective look at Victoria Park” by Barbara Doran

2nd Prize: “Recollections” by Donald A. Munro

Recommended: The judges awarded a Recommendation to Fleur McLennan and to the Probus Club. With Mr Ron Temple accepting the award on behalf of the Probus Club.

Upper High School 

1st Prize: “Kent Street Senior High School” by Miss Lara Jade Cutting

2nd Prize: Not awarded.

What the Judges Said 

The following remarks are based on Mr. Garva’s comments:-

A Retrospective Look at Victoria Park (Part One) by Barbara Doran is a comprehensive and informative, soundly balanced account of the physical and social development of the district, set in the context of the broader community.

Well presented with well captioned illustrations, its narrative is fluent and historic in tone.  Its statement of intent is soundly achieved with the aid of solid and varied sources.  It has the potential to be expanded into a much more detailed work.  It is an effort that contributes to the knowledge of the history of Victoria Park, and for that reason is a worthy winner. [Read Part Two].

Recollections by Donald A. Munro is an original narrative of his anecdotes and observations of the local community.  It is giving us an interesting glimpse of our social history here in Victoria Park.    An oral history interview is underway with Mr. Munro and he has lodged a copy of his diary which describes his time as a soldier and a prisoner of war during world war II.

Kent Street Senior High School by Lara J. Cutting has been well illustrated and the sources are good but the interpretation of the educational and social nature of the work needs to be built on.  Although an attempt has been made, it requires greater effort to place it into the context of the state educational scene and into the needs of the local community of Victoria Park.

The house that Mack built by Fleur McLennan, shows promise with its authentic oral and written sources.   Technically it could be improved with the application of a more historic approach by greater integration of the sources with the narrative. Narratively, the description of the house is sound reflecting the lifestyle of the times, but more could be done socially, especially on Andrew Tate McLennan.

The history of the Probus Club of Victoria Park is a comprehensive account of the Club’s activities told in chronological order and recorded in minute-book-like style.  Very well produced, it is a great record for its members, but lacks vitality for the wider public.  For a local history it needs a more fluent narrative style and has to be placed in the context of the local and state community. 

 

 

1998 Local History Competition

1998 Local History Competition - the inaugural event

The inaugural Local History Awards were held in 1998, the year after the Local History Collection was established. The idea behind the competition (as it was then called) was to encourage people to write or talk about their memories or experiences in the suburbs, or history of the Town of Victoria Park municipality. With all entries being received becoming part of the collection, the information, resources and depth of the collection would also grow. Specific gaps in the collection were identified and some of them were included on the entry form as suggestions for topics to research. To encourage people to see the Library, and the Collection as a safe place to make their valued documents, photographs and memorabilia available, either in the original form or as copies.

The competition was called the Town of Victoria Park Local History Competition and it ran from 17 August to the 25 September 1988. The winners were announced at a function that was held at 6 pm on Proclamation Day, Wednesday 21 October 1998 at the Town’s Administration Centre.

There were two sections in the competition:

  • Open (word limit: 4,000 words with the prize money of: 1st - $500; 2nd - $250)
  • Upper High School (word limit: 2,000 words with the prize money of: 1st - $250; 2nd - $125;  School prize - $250 to the school of the winning student)

Entries were encouraged in the following formats:

  • Written research with the use of photographs, sketches or diagrams if required;
  • A collection of original verse, anecdotes or songs pertaining to the area;
  • Photography, audio visual or videotape of an historical nature, with explanatory notes or commentary;
  • Oral history – an unedited, labelled tape of an interview, accompanied by a brief outline of the topic chosen, a description, evaluation and transcript of the interview.

There was limited promotion of the competition however, and entry forms were sent to Kent Street Senior High School, Ursula Frayne Catholic College, 60 clubs and organisations within the Town, as well as Council departments. The schools were contacted and agreed with the concept of the competition and were willing to support and distribute the entry forms to their students.  When the forms were received, the schools advised that they would not actively encourage the students to enter because the history units for Western Australia were covered in first term.

The concept of the competition was well received by members of the public and the schools but the level of response was disappointing. It was decided thus to hold the competition again in 1999 and hold it earlier in the year to help coincide with the local schools’ delivery of their history programs.

Three entries were received in the open section

A report of the 1998 competition was given at the Ordinary Council Meeting of the Town of Victoria Park on 10 November 1998 where it was also decided that it would support the Library in rerunning the competition again in 1999.